user avatar
Dan Huberty*
Texas House District 127
Status

Incumbent - not seeking reelection

Party

Republican

Occupation

Small Business Owner

Address

1 E Greenway Plaza, Ste. 225, Houston, TX, 77046

Additional Information

First elected to the Texas House in 2010. Current term expires January 2023. Huberty is not seeking re-election to the Texas House in 2022.

Chaired the House Public Education Committee during the 2017 and 2019 legislative sessions.

Endorsed in the 2020 primary election by Texas Parent PAC, a pro-public education organization that advocates for adequate and equitable funding of public schools, local control, teacher quality, and the prevention of private school vouchers. Huberty also received the group's endorsement in 2010.

Endorsed in the 2020 general election and in the Republican primary election by the Houston Chronicle editorial board.

In the 2018 election, he was recommended favorably by Texans for Public Education, a grassroots educators' group that researched and rated candidates in the 2018 election based on their stances toward public schools.

Endorsed in the 2016 Republican primary election by the Texas Home School Coalition, which supports using public funds for private and home-schools, giving private and home-schooled students greater access to public education services, and limiting state oversight of private and home schools.

Received an honorary resolution from the ATPE House of Delegates in 2017 in recognition of his leadership and support for public education during the 85th Legislature.


Related Blog Posts

  • House Vote #1 - 2021: VOUCHERS

    Voted for a budget amendment to prohibit state funds from being spent on private school vouchers. ATPE supported the amendment.

    House Floor Amendment #84 by Rep. Abel Herrero (D-Robstown) to Senate Bill 1 by Sen. Jane Nelson (R-Flower Mound), 87th Legislature, Regular Session. The House passed the ATPE-supported amendment during its debate on the budget bill, April 22, 2021. (Record vote #410. View an official record of the vote in the House Journal.)

  • House Vote #2 - 2021: SPECIAL EDUCATION

    Voted for a bill creating the "Supplemental Special Education Services" grant, which allows parents of eligible students in special education to apply for a grant of up to $1,500 for the purchase of supplemental educational services and materials.

    Senate Bill 1716 by Sen. Larry Taylor (R-Friendswood), sponsored in the House by Rep. Greg Bonnen (R-Friendswood), 87th Legislature, Regular Session. The bill as passed by the Senate would have created a special education voucher program, which ATPE opposed, but the House removed the voucher language. On May 26, 2021, the House voted to pass its version of the bill on third reading, sending SB 1716 to the governor without objection from ATPE. (Record vote #1516. View an official record of the vote in the House Journal.)

  • House Vote #3 - 2021: COMPENSATION

    Voted for an amendment that would have ensured teachers could keep pay raises they had received as a result of 2019 school finance legislation. ATPE supported the amendment.

    House Floor Amendment #14 by Rep. Chris Turner (D-Arlington) to House Bill 1525 by Rep. Dan Huberty (R-Kingsville), 87th Legislature, Regular Session. On April 21, 2021, the House passed the ATPE-supported amendment during its floor debate on a school finance clean-up bill. (Record vote #387. View an official record of the vote in the House Journal.)

  • House Vote #4 - 2021: CIVICS AND CURRICULUM

    Was absent for the vote on a bill that mandated changes to social studies curriculum standards, sought to ban the teaching of concepts that have been associated with "critical race theory," limited students' access to course credit for activities related to legislation, and restricted educators' discussions of controversial topics and current events in the classroom. ATPE opposed the bill.

    House Bill 3979 by Rep. Steve Toth (R-The Woodlands), 87th Legislature, Regular Session. On May 11, 2021, the House voted to pass the ATPE-opposed bill on third reading. (Record vote #982. View an official record of the vote in the House Journal.) Read more about the bill here.

  • House Vote #5 - 2021: CIVICS AND CURRICULUM

    Voted for a bill passed during the second special session that replaced HB 3979 passed during the regular session. The bill requires the State Board of Education to change social studies curriculum standards and seeks to ban the teaching of concepts that have been associated with "critical race theory." SB 3 mandates a civics training academy for certain teachers and requires that teachers address controversial topics in an objective manner free from political bias. ATPE opposed the bill overall but supported House floor amendments that made the bill better than its predecessor, HB 3979. Huberty was the House sponsor of SB 3 and recommended the amendments that were made by the House.

    Senate Bill 3 by Sen. Bryan Hughes (R-Mineola), sponsored in the House by Rep. Dan Huberty (R-Kingwood), 87th Legislature, Second Called Session. On Sept. 2, 2021, the House amended and then voted to approve the bill on third reading. (Record vote #150. View an official record of the vote in the House Journal). Read more about SB 3 here.

  • House Vote #6 - 2021: HOME-SCHOOL UIL

    Voted for a bill that allows home-schooled students to participate in University Interscholastic League (UIL) activities on behalf of and at the expense of a school district without meeting the same academic requirements under "no pass, no play" rules that apply to public school students. ATPE opposed the bill.

    House Bill 547 by Rep. James Frank (R-Wichita Falls), 87th Legislature, Regular Session. On May 13, 2021, the House voted to approve the ATPE-opposed bill on third reading. (Record vote #1028. View an official record of the vote in the House Journal.) The Senate later amended HB 547, removing House provisions that would have given coaches additional authority to verify home-schooled students' academic eligibility and allowed students served by the Texas Juvenile Justice Department to participate in UIL. On May 28, 2021, the House voted to concur with the Senate amendments to the bill, thereby sending a final version of HB 547 to the governor. (Record vote #1556. View an official record of the vote in the House Journal.) Read more about the bill here.

  • House Vote #7 - 2021: CHARTER SCHOOLS

    Voted for a bill that expands property tax exemptions for charter schools and those who lease property to a charter school. ATPE opposed the bill.

    House Bill 3610 by Rep. Barbara Gervin-Hawkins (D-San Antonio), 87th Legislature, Regular Session. On May 8, 2021, the House voted to approve the ATPE-opposed bill on third reading. (Record vote #913. View an official record of the vote in the House Journal.) Read more about the bill here.

  • House Vote #8 - 2021: RETIREMENT

    Voted for a bill authorizing a one-time supplemental payment or "13th check" of up to $2,400 to TRS retirees. ATPE supported the bill.

    Senate Bill 7 by Sen. Joan Huffman (R-Houston), sponsored in the House by Rep. Greg Bonnen (R-Friendswood), 87th Legislature, Second Called Session. On Aug. 30, 2021, the House voted to approve the ATPE-supported bill on third reading. (Record vote #98. View an official record of the vote in the House Journal.)

  • House Vote #9 - 2021: VIRTUAL SCHOOLS

    Was absent for the vote on a bill that would have expanded full-time virtual school programs statewide. ATPE opposed the bill.

    House Bill 1468 by Rep. Keith Bell (R-Forney), 87th Legislature, Regular Session. On April 28, 2021, the House voted to approve the ATPE-opposed bill on third reading. (Record vote #497. View an official record of the vote in the House Journal.) The Senate passed an amended version of HB 1468, and the bill was eventually sent to a conference committee to generate a compromise version. HB 1468 ultimately died when the House failed to vote on the conference committee report before the regular session ended.

  • House Vote #10 - 2021: VIRTUAL SCHOOLS

    Voted for a bill that expands funding and authorization for full-time virtual school programs statewide. ATPE opposed the bill.

    Senate Bill 15 by Sen. Larry Taylor (R-Friendswood), sponsored in the House by Rep. Keith Bell (R-Forney), 87th Legislature, Second Called Session. Based on the ATPE-opposed HB 1468 that failed to pass in the regular session, SB 15 expands state funding options for students in full-time virtual schools. On Aug. 30, 2021, the House voted to pass the bill on third reading. (Record vote #96. View an official record of the vote in the House Journal.)

  • House Vote #11 - 2021: ACCOUNTABILITY

    Voted for a bill that pauses accountability ratings for the 2021-22 school year, halts progressive sanctions for D- and F-rated schools once they earn a C rating, and clarifies due process protections for districts facing sanctions. Huberty was also the House sponsor of the legislation and authored the House amendments to the bill.

    Voted for/Voted against/Was "present not voting" on/Was absent for the vote on a bill that pauses accountability ratings for the 2021-22 school year, halts progressive sanctions for D- and F-rated schools once they earn a C rating, and clarifies due process protections for districts facing sanctions.

  • House Vote #12 - 2021: TESTING/ACCELERATED INSTRUCTION

    Voted for a bill that eliminated the STAAR passage requirement for grade promotion but requires accelerated instruction for students who failed a STAAR test.

    House Bill 4545 by Rep. Harold Dutton (D-Houston), 87th Legislature, Regular Session. On May 28, 2021, the House voted to concur with Senate amendments to the bill, which sent a final version of HB 4545 to the governor. (Record vote #1689. View an official record of the vote in the House Journal). Read more about the bill here.

  • House Vote #13 - 2021: ACCELERATED INSTRUCTION

    Authored and voted for a bill that would have eased implementation of HB 4545, passed during the regular session, by limiting the subjects in which tutoring is required for students who failed a STAAR test and offering temporary relief from tutoring group size limits.

    House Bill 233 by Rep. Dan Huberty (R-Kingwood), 87th Legislature, Second Called Session. On Sept. 2, 2021, the House voted to approve the bill on third reading. (Record vote #153. View an official record of the vote in the House Journal). The bill ultimately died when the Senate declined to hear it before the end of the session. Read more about the bill here.

  • (Historical) House Vote #1 - 2019: EDUCATION FUNDING & REFORM

    Authored and voted for a major school finance and reform bill providing $6.5 billion in increased funding for public education and $5 billion for property tax relief.

    House Bill 3 by Rep. Dan Huberty (R-Kingwood), 86th Legislature, Regular Session. On April 3, 2019, the House voted to approve the bill on third reading. (Record vote #159. View an official record of the vote in the House journal.)

  • (Historical) House Vote #2 - 2019: RETIREMENT

    Voted for an ATPE-supported educator retirement bill making the TRS pension fund sound by increasing contribution rates and authorizing a one-time 13th check for retirees.

    Senate Bill 12 by Sen. Joan Huffman (R-Houston), 86th Legislature, Regular Session. On April 25, 2019, the House voted to approve the bill on third reading. (Record vote #661. View an official record of the vote in the House journal.)

  • (Historical) House Vote #3 - 2019: SCHOOL SAFETY

    Voted for an ATPE-supported school safety bill offering funding to implement school safety improvements and provide mental health resources.

    Senate Bill 11 by Sen. Larry Taylor (R-Friendswood), 86th Legislature, Regular Session. On May 22, 2019, the House voted to approve the bill on third reading. (Record vote #1610. View an official record of the vote in the House journal.)

  • (Historical) House Vote #4 - 2019: SCHOOL SAFETY

    Voted for a floor amendment to Senate Bill 11 requiring the state to identify regional resources that schools can use to address students' mental health needs. The amendment was based on Rep. Allison's HB 4414, a bill supported by ATPE.

    House Floor Amendment #8 by Rep. Steve Allison (R-San Antonio) to Senate Bill 11 by Sen. Larry Taylor (R-Friendswood), 86th Legislature, Regular Session. During the House floor debate on this school safety bill, Rep. Allison offered Floor Amendment #8 to improve mental health resources in schools. The amendment passed on May 21, 2019. (Record vote #1579. View an official record of the vote in the House journal.) Procedural note: This amendment was later reconsidered and amended before being adopted by the House again. (Record vote #1600. View an official record of that subsequent vote in the House journal.)

  • (Historical) House Vote #5 - 2019: CLASS SIZES

    Voted for a bill that would have weakened the 22:1 cap on elementary school class sizes. ATPE opposed the bill.

    House Bill 1133 by Rep. Jonathan Stickland (R-Bedford), 86th Legislature, Regular Session. On May 9, 2019, the House voted to defeat the bill on second reading. (Record vote #1244. View an official record of the vote in the House journal.)

  • (Historical) House Vote #6 - 2019: EDUCATOR QUALITY

    Voted for an ATPE-supported bill that would have funded and strengthened mentoring programs for teachers.

    House Bill 102 by Rep. Diego Bernal (D-San Antonio), 86th Legislature, Regular Session. On April 9, 2019, the House voted to approve the bill on third reading. (Record vote #197. View an official record of the vote in the House journal.) HB 102 did not get heard by the Senate, but its language was incorporated into HB 3 that did pass and become law.

  • (Historical) House Vote #7 - 2019: EDUCATOR QUALITY

    Was absent for the vote on a bill to require certain school districts to assign properly certified teachers to students in elementary grades and prevent students from being taught by first-year teachers in consecutive years. HB 1276 would have applied to school districts with at least 5,000 students, unless the district was exempted under the District of Innovation (DOI) law or received a hardship waiver from the commissioner of education. The bill was designed to prevent students from being assigned for two consecutive school years to teachers with less than one year of experience or teachers not certified in the subject being taught as part of the foundation curriculum. Exceptions were provided for new transfer students and students whose parent or guardian consents to the placement. ATPE supported the bill.

    House Bill 1276 by Rep. Jon Rosenthal (D-Houston), 86th Legislature, Regular Session. On April 25, 2019, the House voted to approve the bill on third reading. (Record vote #746. View an official record of the vote in the House journal.) The bill ultimately died after it did not get heard in the Senate.

  • (Historical) House Vote #8 - 2019: CHARTER SCHOOLS

    Voted for a floor amendment to House Bill 3 to increase the transparency and efficiency of charter schools by requiring them to undergo an audit of their fiscal management prior to expanding or opening new campuses and to share the audit results on their website. ATPE supported the amendment.

    House Floor Amendment #15 by Rep. Ernest Bailes (R-Shepherd) to House Bill 3 by Rep. Dan Huberty (R-Kingwood), 86th Legislature, Regular Session. During the House floor debate on the school finance bill, Rep. Bailes offered Floor Amendment #15 on charter school transparency and efficiency. The amendment passed on April 3, 2019. (Record vote #153. View an official record of the vote in the House journal.) The Senate later stripped the amendment out of the bill.

  • (Historical) House Vote #9 - 2019: POLITICAL INVOLVEMENT

    Was absent for the vote on a bill that would prohibit school districts and other local governmental entities from funding legislative advocacy efforts or paying membership dues to organizations that engage in legislative advocacy.

    Senate Bill 29 by Sen. Bob Hall (R-Edgewood), 86th Legislature, Regular Session. On May 20, 2019, the House voted to defeat the bill on third reading. (Record vote #1519. View an official record of the vote in the House journal.)

  • (Historical) House Vote #1 - 2017: EDUCATION FUNDING

    Voted for the final version of the state's budget bill.

    Senate Bill 1 by Sen. Jane Nelson (R-Flower Mound), 85th Legislature, Regular Session. A conference committee was appointed to resolve differences between House and Senate versions of this primary budget bill. On a motion by Rep. John Zerwas (R-Fulshear), the House voted to adopt the conference committee report and approve the bill for final passage on May 27, 2017. (Record vote #1945. View an official record of the vote in the House journal.)

  • (Historical) House Vote #2 - 2017: EDUCATION FUNDING

    Supported a school finance bill that offered $1.5 billion in additional public school funding. Authored and voted for HB 21, which would have increased the basic and bilingual allotments, added a new allotment for students with dyslexia, and funded hardship grants for certain districts losing money due to the expiration of ASATR (Additional State Aid for Tax Reduction). ATPE supported this bill.

    House Bill 21 by Rep. Dan Huberty (R-Kingwood), 85th Legislature, Regular Session. The House voted to approve the bill on third reading on April 20, 2017. (Record vote #328. View an official record of the vote in the House journal.) This bill did not ultimately pass during the regular session.

  • (Historical) House Vote #3 - 2017: EDUCATION FUNDING

    Supported additional education funding. Authored and voted for a bill to revise the state's school finance system, add $1.8 billion in new funding for public education, and use the state's rainy day fund to shore up the education budget. ATPE supported the bill.

    House Bill 21 by Rep. Dan Huberty (R-Kingwood), 85th Legislature, Special Session. The House voted to approve its version of a school finance bill on third reading on Aug. 7, 2017. (Record vote #72. View an official record of the vote in the House journal.) The Legislature ultimately passed a watered-down Senate version of the bill.

  • (Historical) House Vote #4 - 2017: STUDENT TESTING

    Supported relief from high-stakes testing. Sponsored and voted for an ATPE-supported bill to extend the Individual Graduation Committees (IGC) law to help qualified high school students graduate in spite of failing a required STAAR test.

    Senate Bill 463 by Sen. Kel Seliger (R-Amarillo), 85th Legislature, Regular Session. The House voted to approve the bill on third reading and final passage on May 23, 2017. (Record vote #1606. View an official record of the vote in the House journal.)

  • (Historical) House Vote #5 - 2017: RETIREMENT BENEFITS

    Was absent during the vote on a bill that restructured TRS-Care, the health insurance program for retired teachers. The bill prevented the TRS-Care program from running out of money in 2017 and leaving retired educators without health coverage. ATPE supported the bill.

    House Bill 3976 by Rep. Trent Ashby (R-Lufkin), 85th Legislature, Regular Session. The House voted in favor of a motion to concur with Senate amendments, which enabled final passage of the bill, on May 24, 2017. (Record Vote #1770. View an official record of the vote in the House journal.)

  • (Historical) House Vote #6 - 2017: PAYROLL DEDUCTION

    Voted against a payroll deduction-related amendment that ATPE opposed. The amendment, which failed to pass, called for a state school finance commission to study whether educators should continue to have access to payroll deduction for their voluntary association dues.

    Floor amendment #20 by Rep. Bill Zedler (R-Arlington) to Senate Bill 16 by Sen. Larry Taylor (R-Friendswood), 85th Legislature, Special Session. The House voted against the amendment on Aug. 14, 2017. The amendment failed to pass. (Record vote #167. View an official record of the vote in the House journal.)

  • (Historical) House Vote #7 - 2017: PRIVATE SCHOOL VOUCHERS

    Opposed vouchers. Voted for an amendment that would prevent the state budget bill from being used to fund or support any form of private school voucher. ATPE supported this amendment.

    Floor amendment #8 by Rep. Abel Herrero (D-Corpus Christi) to Senate Bill 1 by Sen. Jane Nelson (R-Flower Mound), 85th Legislature, Regular Session. The House adopted the amendment on April 6, 2017. (Record vote #165. View an official record of the vote in the House journal.)

  • (Historical) House Vote #8 - 2017: PRIVATE SCHOOL VOUCHERS

    Opposed vouchers. Voted for a budget amendment to clarify that no public funds should be used to pay for or support any type of private school voucher. ATPE requested the amendment.

    Floor amendment #9 by Rep. Gary VanDeaver (R-New Boston) to Senate Bill 1 by Sen. Jane Nelson (R-Flower Mound), 85th Legislature, Regular Session. The House adopted the amendment on April 6, 2017. (Record vote #163. View an official record of the vote in the House journal.)

  • (Historical) House Vote #9 - 2017: PRIVATE SCHOOL VOUCHERS

    Opposed vouchers. Opposed a budget amendment that would allow for the possibility of state-funded private school vouchers for certain students. Voted for a motion to table (kill) the amendment. ATPE opposed the amendment and backed the motion to table it.

    Motion by Rep. Abel Herrero (D-Corpus Christi) to table floor amendment #10 by Rep. Briscoe Cain (R-Deer Park) to Senate Bill 1 by Sen. Jane Nelson (R-Flower Mound), 85th Legislature, Regular Session. Cain tried to amend the budget bill in order to allow for the possibility of state-funded vouchers for low-income students. ATPE opposed the Cain amendment and supported Herrero's motion to table (kill) the amendment. The House voted to table Cain's amendment #10 on April 6, 2017. (Record vote #164. View an official record of the vote in the House journal.)

  • (Historical) House Vote #10 - 2017: PRIVATE SCHOOL VOUCHERS

    Opposed vouchers. Voted for a motion aimed at keeping private school voucher language out of a school finance bill. ATPE supported the motion.

    House Bill 21 by Rep. Dan Huberty (R-Kingwood), 85th Legislature, Regular Session. A conference committee was appointed to try to negotiate a compromise between House and Senate versions of a school finance bill. This vote on May 24, 2017, was on an ATPE-supported motion by Rep. John Zerwas (R-Fulshear) to instruct members of that conference committee to reject any language in the bill that would allow private school vouchers. (Record vote #1712. View an official record of the vote in the House journal.)

  • (Historical) House Vote #11 - 2017: PRIVATE SCHOOL VOUCHERS

    Opposed vouchers. Voted against a motion that would have preserved the possibility of state-funded private school vouchers for students with special needs. ATPE opposed the motion.

    House Bill 21 by Rep. Dan Huberty (R-Kingwood), 85th Legislature, Regular Session. A conference committee was appointed to try to negotiate a compromise between House and Senate versions of a school finance bill. This vote on May 24, 2017, was on a motion by Rep. Ron Simmons (R-Carrollton) to instruct members of that conference committee to favor language in the bill that would allow private school vouchers for students with special needs. ATPE opposed the motion to instruct, which failed to pass. (Record vote #1713. View an official record of the vote in the House journal.)

  • (Historical) House Vote #12 - 2017: EDUCATOR QUALITY

    Supported measures to improve educator quality. Voted for a bill to establish a mentoring program for inexperienced teachers and state funding for mentor stipends, scheduled release time, and training. ATPE supported the bill, which later died in the Senate.

    House Bill 816 by Rep. Diego Bernal (D-San Antonio), 85th Legislature, Regular Session. The House approved the bill on third reading on May 11, 2017. (Record vote #1162. View an official record of the vote in the House journal.) The bill ultimately did not pass the Senate.

  • (Historical) House Vote #13 - 2017: EDUCATOR QUALITY

    Supported measures to improve educator quality. Voted for a bill that would prohibit school districts from assigning elementary school students in core subject classes to inexperienced or uncertified teachers for two consecutive years. ATPE supported the bill.

    House Bill 972 by Rep. Helen Giddings (D-Dallas), 85th Legislature, Regular Session. The House approved the bill on third reading on May 6, 2017. (Record vote #954. View an official record of the vote in the House journal.) The bill later died in the Senate.

  • (Historical) House Vote #14 - 2017: SCHOOL SAFETY

    Supported "David's Law." Voted for a bill to prevent and address the problem of cyberbullying in schools. ATPE supported the bill.

    Senate Bill 179 by Sen. Jose Menendez (D-San Antonio), 85th Legislature, Regular Session. The House voted to adopt the conference committee report and finally pass the bill on May 27, 2017. (Record vote #1938. View an official record of the vote in the House journal.)

  • (Historical) House Vote #1 - 2015: TESTING & CURRICULUM

    Authored and voted for a bill to reduce the time spent on state-mandated testing in grades three through eight, shorten the time required for students to complete state tests, and conduct a state study of testing and curriculum standards that are included on the tests. ATPE supported the bill, which passed and was signed into law.

    House Bill 743 by Rep. Dan Huberty (R-Humble), 84th Legislature, Regular Session. The House voted to approve the bill on third reading on May 4, 2015. (View an official record of the vote in the House journal.)

  • (Historical) House Vote #2 - 2015: TESTING & GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

    Voted for a bill to give some high school students who've failed certain STAAR tests a pathway to graduate. Huberty was the House sponsor of the bill. The bill allows individual graduation committees to decide, based on the student's academic record and other measures, if the student is college- and career-ready. ATPE supported the bill, which passed and was signed into law.

    Senate Bill 149 by Sen. Kel Seliger (R-Amarillo), sponsored in the House by Rep. Dan Huberty (R-Humble), 84th Legislature, Regular Session. The House amended and then voted to approve the bill on third reading on April 22, 2015. (View an official record of the vote in the House journal.)

  • (Historical) House Vote #3 - 2015: SUICIDE PREVENTION

    Voted for a bill to address the epidemic of youth suicide by making available additional training for educators in spotting and responding to the warning signs of suicide. ATPE requested and supported the bill, which passed and was signed into law.

    House Bill 2186 by Rep. Byron Cook (R-Corsicana), 84th Legislature, Regular Session. The House voted to approve the bill on third reading on May 7, 2015. (View an official record of the vote in the House journal.)

  • (Historical) House Vote #4 - 2015: PRE-KINDERGARTEN

    Authored and voted for a bill to increase state funding for pre-kindergarten programs that implement certain quality control measures. ATPE supported the bill, which passed and was signed into law.

    House Bill 4 by Rep. Dan Huberty (R-Humble), 84th Legislature, Regular Session. The House voted to approve a committee substitute version of the bill on third reading on April 9, 2015. (View an official record of the vote in the House journal.)

  • (Historical) House Vote #5 - 2015: PRE-KINDERGARTEN & CLASS SIZES

    Opposed an amendment to a pre-kindergarten bill that would have limited class sizes to no more than 18 students per educator. (Huberty moved to table the amendment and voted for the motion to table.) ATPE supported the amendment, which was tabled and did not get added to the bill.

    Motion to Table House Floor Amendment #12 to House Bill 4 by Rep. Dan Huberty (R-Humble), 84th Legislature, Regular Session. Rep. Mary Gonzalez (D-Clint) proposed the amendment to require an 18:1 class-size limit in pre-kindergarten classes, but Rep. Huberty moved to table (kill) the amendment. The House voted to table the Gonzalez amendment on April 8, 2015, via Record Vote #175. (View an official record of the vote in the House journal.)

  • (Historical) House Vote #6 - 2015: PRIVATIZATION & HOME RULE

    Voted for a bill to make it easier for public school districts to be converted to deregulated home rule charter districts that would not be required to maintain salary and employment protections for educators, comply with regulations such as class-size limits, or be held accountable to local voters. ATPE opposed the bill, which failed to pass.

    House Bill 1798 by Rep. Joe Deshotel (D-Beaumont), 84th Legislature, Regular Session. The House considered the bill on second reading on May 13, 2015. (Record Vote #1052. View an official record of the vote in the House journal.)

  • (Historical) House Vote #1 - 2013: EDUCATION FUNDING

    Voted for a budget bill providing increased funding for public education and a partial restoration of the education budget cuts made in 2011.

    Senate Bill 1 by Sen. Tommy Williams (R-The Woodlands), 83rd Legislature, Regular Session. A conference committee was appointed to resolve differences between House and Senate versions of this primary budget bill. On a motion by Rep. John Pitts (R-Waxahachie), the House voted to adopt the conference committee report May 26, 2013 (record vote 1336).

  • (Historical) House Vote #2 - 2013: PRIVATE SCHOOL VOUCHERS

    Voted for an amendment to prohibit public education funds from being spent on private school vouchers.

    During the House floor debate on the budget (Senate Bill 1), Rep. Abel Herrero (D-Corpus Christi) offered Amendment #95 to prohibit the use of funds in the public education budget for private school vouchers. The House voted to adopt the Herrero amendment April 4, 2013 (record vote 169).

  • (Historical) House Vote #3 - 2013: RETIREMENT BENEFITS

    Voted for a bill to shore up the Teacher Retirement System (TRS) and provide most retirees with a benefit increase.

    Senate Bill 1458 by Sen. Robert Duncan (R-Lubbock), 83rd Legislature, Regular Session. The House voted to approve the bill on third reading May 20, 2013 (record vote 949).

  • (Historical) House Vote #4 - 2013: EDUCATOR QUALITY

    Voted for a teacher quality bill to raise the standards for entering the education profession; require districts to provide appraisal results to teachers in a timely manner and consider multiple years' appraisal results in making personnel decisions; and require the state to conduct a survey of teacher working conditions and salaries.

    House Bill 2012 by Rep. Mike Villarreal (D-San Antonio), 83rd Legislature, Regular Session. A conference committee was appointed to resolve differences between House and Senate versions of this bill. On a motion by Rep. Villarreal, the House voted to adopt the conference committee report May 26, 2013 (record vote 1318).

  • (Historical) House Vote #5 - 2013: EDUCATOR QUALITY

    Voted for creating the Texas Teacher Residency Program, a high-quality university program through which new teachers would receive stipends and employment at a school district or charter school while earning a master's degree.

    House Bill 1752 by Rep. Diane Patrick (R-Arlington), 83rd Legislature, Regular Session. After the Senate made changes to the House version of the bill, the House voted on a motion by Rep. Patrick to concur in (accept) the Senate amendments to the bill May 21, 2013 (record vote 1031).

  • (Historical) House Vote #6 - 2013: PRIVATIZATION & SCHOOL ACCOUNTABILITY

    Opposed an amendment to the Achievement School District bill to require ASD schools to be subject to laws pertaining to teacher rights and benefits, discipline and class-size limits. (Voted for the motion to table the amendment.)

    Senate Bill 1718 by Sen. Royce West (D-Dallas), 83rd Legislature, Regular Session. During the House floor debate on this bill that called for creating an "Achievement School District" for certain low-performing schools, Rep. Chris Turner (D-Arlington) offered Amendment #2 to require ASD schools to remain subject to laws pertaining to teacher rights and benefits, discipline and class-size limits. On a motion by Rep. Harold Dutton (D-Houston), the House voted to table (kill) the Turner amendment May 21, 2013 (record vote 1044).

  • (Historical) House Vote #7 - 2013: SCHOOL ACCOUNTABILITY & CLASS SIZES

    Opposed an amendment to impose a maximum 15:1 student-to-certified teacher average ratio within the proposed Achievement School District for certain low-performing schools. (Voted to table the amendment.)

    Senate Bill 1718 by Sen. Royce West (D-Dallas), 83rd Legislature, Regular Session. During the House floor debate on this bill that called for creating an "Achievement School District" for certain low-performing schools, Rep. Diane Patrick (R-Arlington) offered Amendment #7 to require ASD schools to assign no more than 15 students on average to each certified teacher. On a motion by Rep. Harold Dutton (D-Houston), the House voted to table (kill) the Patrick amendment May 21, 2013 (record vote 1046).

  • (Historical) House Vote #8 - 2013: SCHOOL COUNSELORS

    Voted against a bill to require schools to notify the public if a full-time school counselor is not assigned to the campus.

    Senate Bill 401 by Sen. Eddie Lucio Jr. (D-Brownsville), 83rd Legislature, Regular Session. A conference committee was appointed to resolve differences between House and Senate versions of this bill requiring public notice when a full-time school counselor is not assigned to a public school campus. Rep. Alma Allen (D-Houston) moved adoption of the conference committee report. The bill died in the House when the motion to adopt the conference committee report failed May 26, 2013 (record vote 1372).

  • (Historical) House Vote #9 - 2013: CHARTER SCHOOLS

    Voted against an amendment that would have delayed the expansion of charter schools.

    Senate Bill 2 by Sen. Dan Patrick (R-Houston), 83rd Legislature, Regular Session. During the House floor debate on this omnibus charter legislation, Rep. Sylvester Turner (D-Houston) offered Amendment #3 to delay the bill's considerable expansion of charter schools in Texas. The Turner amendment failed to pass May 17, 2013 (record vote 876).

Candidate Survey Responses


Not applicable for 2022; the candidate is not seeking re-election.

Did not respond to the 2020 ATPE Candidate Survey.

Below are the candidate's responses to the 2018 ATPE Candidate Survey:

1. If elected, what will your top priorities for public education be?

As your representative, and the Chairman of the House Committee on Public Education, my number one priority will be to improve the equity and efficiency of our school finance formulas. We attempted to start that process in the 85th Legislative Session through HB 21, which would have allocated nearly 2 billion dollars dedicated to public education and provided much needed updates for some of the school finance formulas. While a version of HB 21 finally passed during the first-called special session, it did not do nearly as much as the original bill to move the ball forward. I have every hope that we can make more progress in this area next session. After Hurricane Harvey ravaged the Gulf Coast in the fall of this year, another very important priority of mine will be to improve state aid for the education community after a natural disaster. The House Committee on Pubic Education has already held two committee hearings on this issue, and the problems experienced by districts range from facility damage to mental health struggles of both students and staff. The problems are far-reaching, and the need for organized, premeditated state response is clear. I am already working with the Texas Education Agency and other stakeholders to draft legislation to improve the agency's ability to quickly and effectively assist districts after such an event, in the hopes that we can be more helpful to our constituents if another disaster of this type strikes. I will also work to establish a program for students with special needs or a 504 designation that would supplement the programs that are operated through the public education system. Not every school or district has the resources they need to best educate all of their students, but the legislature can help public school students though a state program with dedicated state funding and accountability. As a parent of a student with a 504 designation, I understand the need for special tools, resources, and methods that can help these children learn.

 

2. Is there a need to increase state funding to meet the needs of our student population? If so, how would you recommend securing more revenue for public education?

Yes. With around 80,000 new students moving into the state each year, the state has an obligation to not only fund enrollment growth, but to find ways to help all school districts get a fair share of the funding. Currently, the State is only funding education at 38% of the total cost, where less than 10 years ago it was 50%. This has placed the burden on the local communities, which has created an imbalance of funding between the wealthy districts and poor districts. I have worked for my entire career in the legislature to streamline the funding formulas in order to get more money into the classrooms across the state. By reducing testing, supporting our educators, and providing state-sponsored services for vulnerable populations, we will additionally see a better result and more money in the classroom. Last session, I was able to help our fast growth schools by increasing the award amount available to individual districts through the New Instructional Facilities Allotment program. With respect to securing more funding for public education overall, in the House, we had allocated approximately 2 billion additional dollars during the regular session, contingent on the passage of HB 21, of which I was the author. However, that bill was not supported in the end by several of our colleagues. Leading up to next session, I will lead the charge to fight for additional funding in the base budget. This funding will not only finance enrollment growth, but it will be a step in the right direction toward righting our school finance system.

 

3. Healthcare costs for educators have increased dramatically and outpaced the state's contributions, with many current and retired educators now paying more out of pocket than their counterparts in other states or in other professions. As a legislator, how would you address this crisis to ensure that active and retired educators have access to affordable healthcare?

As a small businessman, I too have seen the cost of healthcare rise. It is a real concern, especially for both TRS-Care and TRS Active recipients. To complicate matters, the financial solvency of TRS is unclear. In order to ensure that the agency remained afloat, and to ensure that the beneficiaries of these programs were not disproportionally affected, we provided almost $700 million in additional funding, with the goal of making sure the system is affordable and actually provides a benefit. While the additional funding mentioned above is only part of the solution to address rising costs for participants, this issue could be mitigated through updating the funding formulas next session.

 

4. Do you believe the Teacher Retirement System (TRS) should be maintained as a traditional defined benefit pension plan for all future, current, and retired educators, or do you support converting TRS to a defined contribution plan that is more like a 401(k) plan, in which future benefits are not guaranteed?

I believe that TRS should be maintained as a traditional defined benefit plan. Since teachers are ineligible for Social Security, we need to make sure to protect this aspect of the program. This would not only serve as a benefit to current participants, but it would serve as an incentive to enter and stay in the field of teaching. I have authored bills to enhance the benefit, to provide a 13th check to retirees, and voted to increase the contribution during the last three sessions. As the son and grandson of teachers, I know how critical this is to educators, current and retired, and I will continue to fight for it.

 

5. What do you feel is the proper role of standardized testing in Texas's public education system? For instance, should student test scores be used for school accountability purposes, for evaluating teachers, for measuring student progress, etc.?

Since my time as a school board member, I have not been a fan of Texas's standardized testing system. In my tenure in the legislature, I have authored numerous bills that have addressed the over-testing of our students. During the 84th session, I authored and passed HB 743, which limited the duration of testing to 120 minutes for grades 3-5, and to 180 minutes for grades 6-8, and required a reduction of the amount of the TEKS tested. I was also a co-author on HB 5 during the 83rd session, which reduced EOCs from 15 to 5 tests. Last session, I was a joint author on HB 515, which would have further reduced testing requirements. This bill ultimately did not pass, but I am hopeful that the Legislature will support this cause next session. In both the 84th and 85th legislative sessions, I have passed bills that allow students to be evaluated by Individual Graduation Committees to determine graduation-readiness, if the student has failed some of his or her EOCs. Looking forward to the spring of 2018, my committee will be exploring ways to evaluate student achievement beyond standardized tests. My hope is to introduce legislation next session that will?continue to reduce the dependence on these tests. In my opinion, state-required exams should only be used for measuring progress of a student, from the beginning of the year DBA to an end of the year test. Teachers and their administrators must be able to know if a student is passing or failing, but the teachers need freedom to educate outside of the constraints of a state-level standardized test.

 

6. Would you support a state-funded across-the-board pay raise for all Texas classroom teachers?

Teachers in this state are underpaid. That is a fact. However, a one-time, across-the-board pay raise is not the solution this problem. In my opinion, to compensate teachers more robustly, we should: incentivize pay for those serving at Title One Campuses, pay based on certifications, bonus pay for STEM focused teachers, and incentive pay for continuing education. Like every profession, teachers who go above and beyond should have the opportunity to be rewarded. The state has an obligation to find a way to raise the bar for all teacher salaries and elevate the profession, making it more attractive to both new and existing teachers. A one-time raise could benefit educators in the short term, but it does not consider the future of Texas educators. Currently, our state is losing too many good teachers to other professions due to a lack of competitive pay. By increasing pay for educators through a long-term solution, the state can ensure that educators are justly compensated and are incentivized to remain in the profession. I have supported higher wages for quality teachers for years, and next session will be no exception. This issue was brought up during the special session this summer; however, I felt that we did not have sufficient time to consider the legislation that was filed. My committee will have more time to address this issue in the spring and hopefully find a solution that can provide the highest quality education for our students while also protecting our teachers.??

 

7. To what extent should student performance determine teacher pay?

Teacher pay should not be strictly determined by student performance on statewide, standardized tests. The reason is simple. When a student comes into a new classroom, it can be difficult for educators to make up for gaps in that student's education that did not occur on that campus. Additionally, extenuating factors, like, whether or not a student can speak, read, and write English, or if a student's home life is supportive of their educational goals, can put stressors on a educator that are out of his or her control. Instead, we should measure growth. Students should be gauged on how they do at the beginning of the year with their DBA compared to their end of year results. This allows us to accurately measure student growth and is a more representative of a teacher's affect on that student in the classroom. That being said, we do still need evaluations (like the ones mentioned above) that can be used by administrators to make sure we have a standard system to measure teacher success. Good teachers should be able shine under an evaluation system that is truly indicative of their skills.

 

8. Would you vote to create any type of voucher, tax credit, scholarship, education savings account, or other program aimed at paying for students, including any subpopulation of students, to attend non-public K-12 schools, such as private or home schools?

My record has been very clear on this subject. As a former school board member, I understand that the inadequacy of funding of the current system only gets worse through these initiatives. I do think we need to provide as many opportunities for children to succeed within the current system. The proponents of these ideas want state-dollars (tax-dollars), with no checks and balances. The advocates of vouchers want less money provided to public schools and more money provided to private schools, without the accountability measures that currently exist around those dollars in the public school system. This is not a viable solution to correcting our public education system. The solution is to fix our failing schools, and work collaboratively within our community to provide every option to our children to succeed. We should focus on the real problems in the education system. We need to fix the funding formula, give back control of the schools to the local districts, free up our teachers to teach, and create incentives for the schools to be creative. Additionally, there is plenty of choice in the current system: district-charter partnerships, magnet schools, IB programs, open enrollment charter schools and districts, and dual credit courses through our local community colleges. As an alternative to the voucher argument last session, I supported the idea of a public/private partnership which would allow school districts to partner with outside groups to provide innovative services to students with special needs. I additionally supported a piece of legislation that would give parents additional options for tutoring, behavioral intervention, or other methods of therapy through the public school system, funded through state dollars.

 

9. State law allows educators and other public employees to voluntarily choose to join professional associations like ATPE and have membership dues deducted from their paychecks at no cost to taxpayers. Do you support or oppose letting all public employees use payroll deduction for their membership dues?

During the legislative session, there were several Senate Bills that addressed this issue. Neither bill was passed in House. Moving forward, if the legislature deems that the removal of automatic dues is appropriate, the state must ensure that associations of educations, like ATPE, are not adversely affected. In HD 127, I have seen how important these groups are to keeping educators involved in the legislative process. Texas is a right to work State and employees have a choice (and the right) to belong to any group he or she believes that is in his or her best interest.

 

10. Current law allows school districts with accountability ratings of "C" or better to become Districts of Innovation (DOIs) and exempt themselves from many state statutes, such as elementary school class-size limits, requirements for hiring certified teachers, and more. Would you recommend any changes to the criteria for becoming a DOI? Would you place any limitations on the state laws that can be waived by DOIs?

Districts of Innovation were established by HB 1842 during the 84th Legislative Session. While there are several school districts across the state that have taken advantage of this program, not enough time has passed to implement any sort of roll back. However, I am concerned about the potential for school districts to circumvent the idea of having certified teachers. Accordingly, one of the interim charges we will address is teacher quality and certifications. I have always been a supporter of evaluating a program on concrete data. If there are any changes that need to be addressed once we get a clearer picture of how these programs are functioning, I trust that the committee will listen to all testimony and make decisions to support the education community.

 

Additional Comments from Candidate on Survey


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